Revitalised Colosimo loving life

For a long time, Simon Colosimo didn't quite feel right inking the words 'professional footballer' on the line asking for a profession on his annual tax return form.

For a long time, Simon Colosimo didn't quite feel right inking the words 'professional footballer' on the line asking for a profession on his annual tax return form.

Sure, he was a professional in that he was getting paid to play.

Or, more accurately, getting paid but not playing.

Colosimo's litany of injury problems over the past few years would fill a season of RPA.

Crutches became a must-have accessory.

But six games into the 2009/10 Hyundai A-League season, it appears the Sydney FC defender's days as a rehab 'junkie' are over.

Showing no sign of the groin injury that de-railed much of last summer's campaign, the former Socceroo has formed a rock-solid partnership with Stephan Keller in the middle of the Sky Blues' defence.

Their union has helped Sydney to second spot on the back of three wins and a draw from six matches.

Suddenly, Colosimo is no longer in denial about who he is and what he does for a living.

"I feel like a footballer again … for the first time in ages," the 30-year-old told Sportal.

"It's good to be playing a few games injury-free. I've regained my enjoyment for the game as a result."

"I was down for a while but I haven't been this happy about my football for a long time."

Colosimo's demeanour is not just due to the fact he is packing boots in his kit bag instead of x-rays.

Sydney FC's metamorphosis under Vitezslav Lavicka has revitalised everyone from the receptionist to marquee signing John Aloisi.

"You come in and feel like a footballer … everything is there and there are no excuses for not performing at your best," Colosimo said.

"The club is working ever so hard to build a good squad and I think we're doing it - not only on the field but the club as a whole has taken leaps and bounds."

"It's very professional on and off the field and a good place to be around."

Sydney FC general manager Dave Mason has noticed a marked difference in Colosimo, very much upbeat compared to the haunted figure who dragged his battered carcass to work last season.

"When a player's just training and going to rehab like Simon was last year, it does get them down," Mason said.

"But we knew Simon's qualities - both as a person and a footballer - and we saw him as a crucial component to the changes we were trying to make culturally at the club and as a team."

"He's always had the ability and he's shown that again so far this season."

"It's little wonder he's getting around the place with a big smile on his face."

Off the pitch, Colosimo and wife Bianca have just welcomed a second child into their family.

A growing brood tends to sharpen a man's focus on the future, but Colosimo knows better than to tempt football fate by looking too far ahead.

"I'm very happy at the moment but a month, a week or even a day in football is a long, long time," he said.

"I'm just enjoying the ride and going with it at the moment."

"I know more than anyone how quickly it can all change."