Cornthwaite backs Reds set-up

Adelaide United defender Robbie Cornthwaite has backed the Reds' lone striker formation because he believes the club doesn't have the 'personnel' to run with two players in attack.

Adelaide United defender Robbie Cornthwaite has backed the Reds' lone striker formation because he believes the club doesn't have the 'personnel' to run with two players in attack.

United is averaging a goal per game and last week its 4-2-3-1 line-up came under criticism from Lloyd Owusu who wants a partner up forward.

Cornthwaite said the players were working hard to make the current system work more effectively and wouldn't be changing their approach against Newcastle at Hindmarsh Stadium on Monday.

"With five in the midfield it really gives us an opportunity to get on top of the game, we really bully that midfield with that extra number in there and we are able to break forward very quickly with a lot of numbers going forward," Cornthwaite told radio 5AA.

"I'm not 100 percent sure whether we've got the personnel at the moment to play with two up front so I think we'll be sticking with Lloydy up there."

The Jets have had their own problems in attack and have lost their past three games but Cornthwaite said the signing of Michael Bridges could help get their season back on track.

"Newcastle have played some very good football, they are a good footballing side, they pass the ball and build up a lot from the back and through the midfield," he said.

"They've just been lacking a little bit up front with a few injuries and a few of their younger boys on international duties."

"With the signing of Bridges it's going to add a bit more to their attack and we'll definitely be on our toes."

Meanwhile, Cornthwaite has been a steady contributor for Adelaide since returning from a two-game club-imposed suspension for an off-field incident back in August.

The defender said he was trying to get his 'mind back on playing football' and draw positives from a community service stint with the Hutt Street Centre - an organisation that supports homeless or vulnerable people.

"Some of the guys in there are massive soccer fans so it's even more important to get the win so they don't give us too much stick when I go in," he joked.

"I was a little bit nervous going in the first time but once I was in the day centre and talking to a few of the guys, they are just normal guys that have fallen on hard times."

"Listen to some of their stories and the things they have to go through is quite an eye-opening experience and I'm actually quite enjoying it."