A-League ignoring state talent

The rise of Melbourne Heart youngster David Vrankovic shows how Hyundai A-League clubs should be looking to their own backyards for upcoming talent.

The rise of Melbourne Heart youngster David Vrankovic shows how Hyundai A-League clubs should be looking to their own backyards for upcoming talent, according to Bonnyrigg White Eagles coach Brian Brown.

Brown, a multiple title-winning coach in the NSW state league, has been involved in some of the finest young players to graduate into the national competition in recent seasons.

After spotting Vrankovic during his stint with the Sydney FC National Youth League set-up, he signed the talented defender for Bonnyrigg, paving his way to Melbourne Heart and the Qantas Young Socceroos.

And while Brown admitted that Vrankovic is a particularly outstanding prospect, he also said that A-League clubs are perhaps guilty of not doing their research into the second tier of Australian football.

And while Brown admitted that Vrankovic is a particularly outstanding prospect, he also said that A-League clubs are perhaps guilty of not doing their research into the second tier of Australian football.

“If every kid in this world was like David Vrankovic, the world would be a pretty good place to live,” Brown told a-league.com.au.

“He just wants to learn and be the best he can. In one of David-s early sessions with Bonnyrigg, we were doing some running and hard work and one of the senior players at the time told him to slow down, and David said, “Well no, I-m not going to go slower because I want to be a football player, I-m going to go as hard as I can”.

“And that sums him up. At the end of last season he played pretty much every game and improved every week he went on the park. It was inevitable he was going to the A-League.”

With almost two decades experience as a coach, Brown has brought the likes of Qantas Socceroo Mark Milligan, Adam Kwasnik, Oliver Bozanic and Scott Jamieson through the local leagues, and believes they remain the best proving ground for young players and a much under-used resource for A-League clubs.

“The state league is the future of the game,” Brown said.

“I-m not sure if the A-League coaches do enough scouting in our competition or in the other states. When I played in the UK every club had scouts all over the country and I-m not sure if that happens here. If the clubs are doing it they-re keeping it secret.

“A-League coaches are under enormous pressure to win and it-s not easy for them to take a punt on a young player but that should be part of every club-s plan going forward - get the right coach and give them the opportunity to grow young players.

“But there are some players [at this level] who could do a job. In the A-League there have been a lot of players recycled with players moving from one club to another, but some of the young boys should be given a chance."